Looking Back At the Years

It has been quite a journey for me, both personally and professionally, ever since I set up AMH Pianos. With my work gaining constant coverage across London, I have been profoundly affected by the multi-cultural surroundings, which seems to exhibit novel creative and social dimensions not found in Bristol and the West Country. I feel as if the vibes of the capital have moved me; shaped my ways of thinking as well as my perspective in life. I do wonder, what might have been, had I not made the bold move of taking the world on my own terms, in new surroundings. Certainly, whatever has become of me in the last few years, has been a substantial improvement.

With my birthday on the horizon, I reminisce about my own personal development. Ever since my relocation to Hammersmith in West London, I have had the pleasure of meeting so many unique, interesting individuals, from all walks of life. I not only am tasked with looking after their pianos, they are also my friends. Being in the capital, my offerings related to piano removals and full scale general repairs have allowed me exposure to an even greater array of instruments, in different surroundings. Constant exposure to all makes and models has ensured that I am able to provide a better tuning service with the passage of time.

In addition to what I know best, I have also learned the use of social media and have even gained quite a fan following. Blogging, training for the London Marathon, and being exposed to the arts, has without a doubt, filled in many of the building blocks that nowhere else in the country could. However, in the grand scheme of things, all this is merely the tip of the iceberg.

The greatest accomplishment for me, I feel, has been my personal development on the people skills front. Each time one of my customers provide me with praise and thanks, appreciating what I have done, I feel so much taller, yet humbled. For a new place to be favourable, it is not the environment or infrastructure, but rather the people who make up the community. Being blessed to be part of a cosmopolitan, multifaceted and creative mix, I come away each day learning not just something new, but often something so out of the box. This daily phenomena is sufficient to keep me grounded, since whenever I feel like I have learnt a great deal, I also find myself thinking that I have really not learnt anything at all. Still however, there is a long way to go before world domination.

When Using a Service Provider, Check their Views on Google

It is 2015, and everyone now has ready access to the web. Service providers, therefore, should be very intent on fostering good relations with their customers, suppliers and distributors. This is because these days, news not only travels fast, it travels instantly, and remains in the public view forever! Whenever you are looking to work with someone new, you have to ensure that their goals and your expectations are on the same page so that you can avoid disappointments later.

To gauge a service provider you could look into what they think about social media. GooglePlus is a social platform where individuals and businesses get together because of their shared interests in various trends. The platform also provides past customers to provide reviews about a product or service they have recently received. Sites like Facebook and Twitter, provide individuals to talk about their thoughts and feelings about any subject in real time. Additionally, Linkedin is perhaps the most effective way that you can read your service provider’s CV.

The more engaged a service provider is on social media, the more easily accessible they are. Such presence also makes for good accountability and honest, transparent communication. In addition, as a customer, your queries get answered readily, and you can even get a more personalized experience. Whenever you see service providers who are keen on establishing contact with their clients it shows that they seek to work together with them to provide efficient value for money; it shows their devotion since they are taking time off to post about progress and have dialogues with a human being. This digital evolution has made it possible to eliminate the traditional model of customers just being another number. The benefits of embracing technology are mutual for the service provider and user.

Real time feedback, leading to substantial improvement, is what leads to great service in a fast paced modern world, where ratings are now everything. Sites such as Yell and Thomson Local, once merely a directory listing, have now evolved to also describe the user experience of others, to help you make a more informed choice.

With a recent survey suggesting that as much as 93% of the people now trust online reviews, I find it shocking to know that so many of my contemporaries are still not online. In fact, they refuse to get digitally acquainted, in spite being told of the benefits and competitive advantage of doing so. When such people are called on to provide a trade/service, you may find that a lack of digital understanding will probably manifest into a lack of appreciation of today’s lifestyles and the resulting considerations, such as punctuality, communication and flexibility that makes all the difference these days.

It is always worth your while to research your service providers so that you can know just what they are like. Learn what they believe in so that you can be sure that you are reading from the same script during interaction, which may require repetition. On that subject, please feel free to read our testimonials, and if possible, please write us a review.

Local Piano Tuner

I have thought about a really interesting mindset; let me try to explain. When I finished moving to London, and set up AMH Pianos, I found that people would call me, and ask if I am a Local Piano Tuner!

I have to ask them, "What actually makes a Local Piano Tuner?". I am Based in Hammersmith, and my working area is all across London – please check my Areas Covered Page to find out where I serve.

I think the Idea of a Local service is very undefined, and near impossible to actually qualify, for example:

If I got on the Hammersmith and City Line from Goldhawk Road, for a job in and around London Bridge, I would then consider myself as being local to Camden, Greenwich, Southwark, Lambeth, Wandsworth at this point of my working day.

Also, If I had a job in Ealing, traveling  up on the Central Line from Shepherds Bush, I would then be Local to Richmond, Hammersmith & Fulham, Kensington & Chelsea, and so on. There is a definite pattern here. Can you see what I am talking about?

Is there some kind of an invisible, “local area distinction”?! And if so, could someone please explain to a new London resident like me what these are, and why? I am aware of so many people with their crash pads in London, working  in London during the week, and getting away for the weekend.

I am also aware of Piano Tuners, who don’t live in the city, but come and work in London for a couple of days, and then head back home, which happens to be outside the Greater London boundaries.

Can there be such a thing as a London wide Local Piano Tuning Service?
I believe that in the 21st century, we are all living in a "Global Village". Still however, if you were to operate more than five miles from one's home in London, you may not be considered local anymore.

I wonder, how far is the average commute in the City, and are these people looked at as being non Local at their place of work?

Scratching head trying to work out what the answer really is!! My own personal view is that to be truly considered local, anywhere, the key is to develop close ties with the area, community and activities within that area. Least of all, this would begain you respect from the people for your efforts

Please call on us: AMH Pianos- Local London wide Piano Related Services.

Piano Tuning Cost

As a fully qualified Piano Tuner, I sometimes wonder, how much are my skills really worth in 2015?

I trained for three years learning all aspects of Piano tuning and Piano Repairs, developing my skills to a very high standard. Only after rigorous training at the Royal National College (RNC) and after acquiring a Dip AEWVH did I started acquiring on the job experience, perfecting my skills and technique over many years.

The costs of piano tuning in London ranges from £50 up to £100. In spite of my highly competitive rates, I get customers who regularly try to haggle over the price with me when they call. Is it me, or would these same people argue over the costs of their cars being fixed at a high end dealership? “Will you give me a ten percent discount on your pricing?”, is what I regularly encounter at the time of bookings. I consequently try to laugh it off, saying: “Yes, you can have a discount, if you are willing to bring the piano to me for tuning.” . Sadly, the service users do not normally get the joke.

A piano tuning takes at least one hour, plus  naturally there is the travel time and cost of getting to and from the clients home to consider. Travelling across London generally takes more than the time spent at the clients' home, all whilst transporting my tools and keeping these in good working order..

There are certain tradesmen, who charge a call out fee, before they start any job,  and this is considered as standard practice. So why is the craft of a Piano tuner, not consider to be a highly skilled professional trade? Lots of people would attempt basic electrical work around the house themselves. And yet, how many would actually try to finely tune a concert grand piano? Or for that matter, how many could even attempt sound restoration and instrument servicing on an ordinary domestic upright piano?

Please take a look at my website to see the quality of work, and how professional a service we offer. You can expect nothing but the best, most affordable name in tuning and repairing pianos, and we can also offer removals of pianos in and around London.

I take great pride in my work. Therefore, an affordable and friendly service request for AMH Pianos will always aim to hit the right chord for your instrument, and indeed your pockets.


In praise of Greenwich

Thought I would offer a little insight into some of the areas in which I tune pianos throughout London.

One of the Boroughs I enjoy working in is Greenwich. I love the history of the place, and the mix of districts within Greenwich: Abbey Wood, Blackheath, Charlton, Eltham, North Greenwich, Thamesmead, Westcombe Park, to name but a few!

Each of these areas has its own personality, offering great diversity and a colourful mix throughout the Borough of Greenwich.

I really enjoy the history of Eltham, what with the quintessentially English royal Palace, and I wish so much that I could travel back in time and see what life was like there in the Fifteenth Century!

Having moved to London recently, I make the most of what the city has on offer, and you will see me going to concerts at the 02. I have also been fortunate enough to have walked over the top of the Dome, and taken the cable car across the Thames.

I really enjoy the trip aboard the Thames Clipper along the riverbank into Westminster. I especially love this trip at night time, marvelling at all the amazing buildings and bridges lit up as you make your way to Westminster Palace.

My favourite sights include St Paul’s cathedral, the amazing Shard at London Bridge, and Tower Bridge at night time. It was fascinating to discover that Tower Bridge is classed as a ship, and has a captain manning the helm at all times.

The reason I’m writing this blog about Greenwich is chiefly the result of my time spent exploring the Borough following my recent relocation to London.

Time is such an interesting concept, and I guess the Borough of Greenwich is the modern day focal point of time, “the Prime Meridian Line”.

I have so much more to say about the Borough, what with music and entertainment over the years, but for now, it is time for me to go!

Moving to a New City with Your Piano

Whenever it is time to move to a new city there is always excitement about the many opportunities that one is likely to encounter when moving to greener pastures. When the excitement dies down though, the worrying begins. or anyone involved in the music industry, there are the practical considerations, including the logistics around a safe relocation of the musical instrument. These are on top of the anxiety about the relocation being worth the hassle.

For pianists, who need to account for their piano, in addition to themselves in a new environment, the following factors need to be given thought.

Travel arrangements

A piano is a large, heavy and bulky instrument. The mere thought of moving it across the city could raise ample concerns. Piano removals is unlike any ordinary furniture and fittings. It requires planning, a safe pair of trusted hands, plus an assurance that the task would be carried out safely, in a prompt and expeditious manner, without damage to the instrument or the properties it is being moved to and from. For those tight corners within a house, narrow hallways, or on the rare occasions when the piano is on the top floors, special tools such as forklifts and cranes may need to be employed, and the level of noise within the surrounding neighbourhoods would need to be minimised.

Cost of moving the Instrument

Musical treasures are very personal to their owners. The process of transporting such revered, often costly gems, is not like any other weighty luggage. Instruments like the piano need to be transported in bespoke containers, with sufficient padding and insulation. When the transport is over a sizeable distance, the carriage of the instrument needs to be performed using heavy goods vehicles (HGVs). Time and labour become important aspects, and associated costs need to be budgeted beforehand.


A piano needs to be regularly tuned every once in a while. Regular maintenance helps with instrumental longevity and personal creativity – a vital combination for any music lover. Therefore, post relocation, the job of finding the most qualified piano tuner technician begins. Depending on your final destination, the rates and operating hours of such personnel in the area may be significantly different, and finding the best, most qualified pair of hands, will demand time and effort to carry out research on this vital service. This requirement would most likely appear soon after your move, particularly because an instrument often needs a check up and professional clean following a move, which could cause the sound to be out of balance due to unexpected vibrations during transportation.


It is also important to consider if there will be sufficient space for you to place your piano in the residence you are moving into in the new city. You have to ensure that the building you are occupying has enough room for all your personal belongings as well as your instrument. Spacious surroundings lead to richer sounds, plus personal comfort and prevention against accidental damage.

In Summary

It is important to carry out research and ask plenty of questions about your new surroundings, particularly before finalising your relocation plans. Fortunately, with the advent of modern technology, there are a vast array of resources available online, to get you started. At AMH Pianos, we are always here to help you should you require industry leading piano removal services. For any queries you may have about transporting your piano, please do not hesitate to get in touch.

Having Your Piano Tuned Twice a Year

You may already be familiar with the importance of having your piano tuned regularly. However, one common question is always directed towards me: How often should I have my piano tuned? Conventional wisdom, as well as textbook training generally gears men and women within our profession to give a piano a bi-annual once over. However, this figure is only a theoretical guide, and not the be all and end all. Real world factors, the environment, and even your level of interaction with the instrument, all play important part in determining the level of care that is essential for your piano’s optimum health.

Your piano is made of different materials, both metallic and non-metallic that contract and expand according to seasonal variations. Changes in weather impact each material differently, and the difference in thermal expansion/contraction values, heat absorption, and consequently the continuous effect of climate change on the inter-connected instrument components,, inevitably takes its toll on the overall sound and tonality of your piano. Couple this with the often unavoidable presence of thermostats, central heating systems, air conditioners and coolers, and night storage heaters within our homes, schools and other buildings housing the piano. The perfect pitch cannot be maintained ad infinitum, unless of course, one was to simulate something akin to a temperature controlled lab surrounding the piano.

Perhaps however, the most important factor within the whole equation carries more weight than any other points discussed above: Humidity! Not only does the presence of high humidity causes the instrument to lose its level of sound, the exposure of your instrument to high humidity and moisture can cause ever lasting damage to the instrument.

Below are some of the factors that will ensure you only need to have your piano tuned twice a year.

• Location

Finding the perfect and stable environment for your piano will ensure that you only have it tuned twice a year. Look for a location where there is no air conditioning, fire place, radiator, direct sunlight or any type of heating devices. Place your piano away from outside walls and in a place where the humidity doesn’t change all the time.

• Material and humidity

The primary material of your piano is wood: one that is highly affected by small seasonal changes in humidity. Humidity change also contributes somewhat to the natural heat related material expansion and contraction. This swelling and shrinking can cause cracks within the wood and affects the tuning stability of your piano. Placing your piano in a location where humidity is stable, and minimal, will ensure that the tuning of your piano lasts longer and on the whole, stays relatively close to the twice yearly tuning cycle, whilst curtailing the need for full scale restoration.

• Professional piano tuner

Finding a good, capable professional to tune your piano is another way of avoiding unexpected tuning. A qualified piano tuner will tune your piano and let you play for at least two hours straight or even more. If the sound quality stays constant after this initial test, as long as other factors are stable and you do not carry out a move of the instrument, you will only need to have a professional tune it twice a year to preserve its tune.

Even though a piano that is well maintained and kept under favourable, stable climates, may demo good sound over a calendar year without being tuned, it is advisable to have a professional tune it twice a year. The good quality of the keys will be maintained and your piano will remain well preserved; besides you will avoid repair costs in the future.

Best Piano Service Provider in Harley Street W1

Choosing the best piano service provider can be quite difficult especially if you haven’t used one before. In Harley Street W1 it isn’t any different but you can find the best piano service provider by looking at track records and asking people who have had their piano tuned for help. Whether you want your piano tuned, moved, repaired or restored it is important to choose a service provider you know will handle your treasured instrument with care. If your piano is carelessly handled, it can be damaged for good. Therefore it is imperative to find the best piano service provider in Harley Street W1 and the surrounding area to rise to the challenge.

Here are some ways to find the best piano service providers in your chosen area.


If you want your piano tuned, looking for an experienced service provider is highly advised. Look for a service provider using a professional body such as the
Association of Blind Piano Tuners
. Comb through the list of piano service providers and hire the one with the most experience. Compromise on experience at your own peril.


A competent service provider would have surely taken out cover for all eventualities and for compliance. This includes public liability and professional indemnity. Of particular importance, perhaps, is the requisite piano removals insurance necessary to perform safe, hassle free relocation of your instrument.


Moving your piano can be a fraught and arduous experience. It is easy to accidentally scratch or damage the delicate mechanism if the instrument is not adequately shielded. In Harley Street W1 this problem is solved very easily by contacting us. We will help you with the padding of your piano and carrying it into the vehicle for transportation, even through tight spaces and around awkward corners, whilst minimising disruption.

We care more about your piano than the money you pay us for our services. We handle your piano with the utmost care through each element of the service that we provide. Get experienced, trusted, and qualified piano service providers to handle your musical equipment.


If you want more information about the best piano service provider in Harley Street W1 go to http://www.tuningpianos.co.uk. You will find everything you need to know about piano services.

Should You Tip a Piano Tuner?

The issue of whether or not it is good manners and proper etiquette to tip piano tuners, is very controversial. No one seems to agree on how the issue should be handled. There is no “one size fits all” here. Some feel that the tuner should be rewarded for his/her effort while others believe it is too much for them to expect gratuities; and there is another group that does not lean either way.

People usually have no reservations tipping other service providers, like valets, butlers, concierge staff or even hairdressers. Yet they seem to have a particular hangup when it comes to people within my industry. I wonder what difference there is between these individuals except their professions of course. Be that as it may, they are still service providers, and if it is right to tip some, then I think it is right to tip them all.

Due to the heated exchanges that ensue whenever this controversial topic is discussed, many have learned to resort to diplomacy when the subject is too much for them to handle. It is then you will hear them concur, saying that the choice should belong to the individual receiving the service, to decide whether to tip or not.

Gratuity Jar

For most service users, it appears that there is an unwritten rule: it’s ok to tip the tuner if they are self-employed but not if they are working for a large agency. It is not understood where these sentiments originated but since these make people feel better about not tipping piano tuners, there is nothing more that can be said. After all, the customer is always right. However, to reward good service, is an age-old incentive for even better receipt of provisions in the future.


If you have contracted the services of a piano tuner, it is up to you to decide whether the work they have done for you deserves a tip or not. If it does, tip them graciously, and you can expect your reward in return.


Remember to tip service providers if they have delivered satisfactory services for you. If you wish to know more about this and more, please log on to http://www.tuningpianos.co.uk/blog/, or get in touch. And finally, remember that you can always expect outstanding services from us on every occasion.

Is London’s music up-tempo?

Having moved to London not so long ago, I have noticed a definite surge in my energy. The crowds and the hustle and bustle, coupled with the relentless pace of life, are all definitely a shock to anyone’s system, especially if the person has not been accustomed to living in big cities. Now that I am settled and gradually becoming more established, I can certainly appreciate the whole spectrum of activity and opportunities that this world-renowned capital of ours has to offer… and I love it more every day.

I love London guitar

Having lived in Bristol and Bath for a considerable chunk of my life, I was fortunate enough to attend plenty of events that featured some of the best music I have ever heard. Whilst Bristol may be renowned for its music scene, there is certainly no place like London when it comes to the Arts. Having just attended an Ed Sheeran gig last week, it got me thinking: does London’s music tempo match its lifestyle?

Comparing the size, population and average distance travelled per week, the pace of London completely dwarfs that of Bristol. I now find myself walking and talking faster and I certainly want to achieve a lot more in the smallest possible timeframe. Assuming that this phenomenon applies to every Londoner, does it mean that I am now listening to more up-tempo music to match my energetic lifestyle? London has certainly given rise to many musical genres including Drum and Bass and more recently Dubstep – both being a somewhat up-tempo take on the world famous West Indian influences of Reggae, Calypso and Steel Band. I have not conducted formal scientific research. However, I do wonder whether or not my music loving customers expect their pianos to be prepared differently to produce more up-tempo and louder sounds so that they can play at top-notch speed. Given that a piano is always a piano and serviced in exactly the same way to produce the best quality of music regardless of location, are there underlying factors expected by the piano player to aid their composition that matches the pace of their lifestyle. It goes without saying that with each passing day I seem to be working faster and more efficiently in line with the London way of life.

Street Piano London
courtesy: streetpianos.com

Humans have a tendency to naturally increase their rhythm over time once they have mastered a particular pattern – a psychological phenomenon known as forward telescoping. It is therefore imperative that strict discipline is required to counteract this tendency if one intends to produce top quality music. The question still remains: Does the pace of London, or for that matter any city, impact the rate of playing or producing music? I would certainly love to hear from my readers purely to generate interesting ideas on the subject that I could one day turn into academic research.

Give a shout out in the comments! :)