What makes for the best piano tuning in Kensington & Chelsea?

The art of Piano tuning requires an expert. Such a person is not only qualified, they additionally possess the experience to work with all makes and models of pianos. We provide the most wide ranging piano tuning service in Kensington and Chelsea. If your piano sounds underwhelming or out of pitch, then it needs to be tuned, no doubt. In fact, the sooner, the better, since timely maintenance would allow the instrument to last longer, preventing damage due to wear and tear, whilst also saving you spending more cash long term.

Whilst we strive to provide a great experience, locally, to our friends in Kensington and Chelsea, let’s talk about what makes for a great service experience.


The most important consideration, in tuning your piano, is a no brainer. The importance of the right tools used for the job is self-explanatory. A range of mechanical implements make up our working gear. Owing to the varied tastes in piano models in Kensington and Chelsea, a good tool bag must be able to tackle all kinds of pianos, especially if the service provider does not know the instrument type beforehand. Therefore, be it a grand piano, an upright piano used at home for the family, or a rare square piano used for some of those Bach concertos. A competent service provider must have the common tools such as tuning hammer and lever, a variety of mutes, and a tuning fork or electronic tuning device. Furthermore, in case of a complicated job, one must be able to source the appropriate tools quickly, and preferably, locally within Chelsea and Kensington.


Honesty is perhaps the most important virtue in every successful business. A good piano tuning service provider should employ honest technicians, who tend to look after your piano as if it was their own property. Success boils down to delivering on promises, and value for money. Honest communication becomes paramount in this industry, given that one of us would normally be working inside your premises.


The best piano tuning service providers operating within Kensington and Chelsea will always assess the condition of your piano before even beginning the tuning process.We at AMH Pianos offer this free of charge, and the appraisal determines the nature of the work to be carried out, along with any additional costs to be incurred in the event of substantial work being required. A technician finds the strings that need to be tuned and using dampers, the healthy and loose strings are temporarily muted and secured. This assessment also determines the condition of the wood holding the strings. Poorly presented wood may demand that the instrument would first need to be repaired before tuning may commence. Always remember to ask your piano tuner for a full breakdown of their diagnosis. This ultimately determines the cost and time for the work to be completed.


Your piano is a delicate instrument and dust can hinder the performance of the keys. When you hire a professional piano tuner in Kensington and Chelsea, please request for the piano to be professionally cleaned at the same time. Avoid cleaning inside parts of your piano yourself;the internal mechanism is delicate and susceptible to irreversible damage if not handled correctly. However, cleaning the outside of the instrument is perfectly fine – in fact, highly recommended.


When you need your piano tuned, please avoid tackling the task yourself. Tuning a piano is markedly different from tuning a guitar, and professionals like ourselves have spent years perfecting our expertise for your convenience. Additionally, we are also able to assess and advise on the most efficient and cost-effective solutions in case there is such a need. Besides, such piano tuners have the right tools.

Visit AMH Pianos if you want to know more about the best piano tuning service in Kensington and Chelsea. Alternatively, why not look at our coverage checker to see if you are covered.

Is Fixing My Piano Part of the Tuning of the Piano?

People love freebies too much. Some have even come to love free things with an un-understandable keenness. People have almost learnt to wait for free things all the time, so much so that they begin to expect them automatically. Many people then have been quoted asking whether fixing their pianos is part of the process that includes tuning of the pianos.

The answer to that very common question is a No. The reason is that fixing of pianos is done whenever a piano has been damaged in any way. That is the scenario that calls for a specialist to repair it. If it is found to be beyond repair, it is then thrown into the lot where recycled materials are thrown.

Tuning though, is a gradual process that takes place regularly where an expert seeks to align the pitch and keys properly. Such an expert has the musical ear to know how to align and tune the keys, so that they produce the notes in the best way possible.

Inside a piano about to be tuned

Another huge difference between fixing pianos and tuning them is in the costs. Depending on the kind of damage that is being fixed, the cost could either be extremely high or extremely low. Tuning though, is a uniform process that may not vary very much in costing unless the demographics are too far apart. This is not a frequent occurrence. One cannot replace the other and it cannot complement the other.


Fixing pianos is quite demanding and takes quite a bit of time; therefore it cannot be considered to be part of the tuning process. The two are very different processes and they also require different specialisms too, to some extent.


Visit http://www.tuningpianos.co.uk/faq.html and have an audience with the experts who will tell you whatever else you would like to ask.

Should You Tip a Piano Tuner?

The issue of whether or not it is good manners and proper etiquette to tip piano tuners, is very controversial. No one seems to agree on how the issue should be handled. There is no “one size fits all” here. Some feel that the tuner should be rewarded for his/her effort while others believe it is too much for them to expect gratuities; and there is another group that does not lean either way.

People usually have no reservations tipping other service providers, like valets, butlers, concierge staff or even hairdressers. Yet they seem to have a particular hangup when it comes to people within my industry. I wonder what difference there is between these individuals except their professions of course. Be that as it may, they are still service providers, and if it is right to tip some, then I think it is right to tip them all.

Due to the heated exchanges that ensue whenever this controversial topic is discussed, many have learned to resort to diplomacy when the subject is too much for them to handle. It is then you will hear them concur, saying that the choice should belong to the individual receiving the service, to decide whether to tip or not.

Gratuity Jar

For most service users, it appears that there is an unwritten rule: it’s ok to tip the tuner if they are self-employed but not if they are working for a large agency. It is not understood where these sentiments originated but since these make people feel better about not tipping piano tuners, there is nothing more that can be said. After all, the customer is always right. However, to reward good service, is an age-old incentive for even better receipt of provisions in the future.


If you have contracted the services of a piano tuner, it is up to you to decide whether the work they have done for you deserves a tip or not. If it does, tip them graciously, and you can expect your reward in return.


Remember to tip service providers if they have delivered satisfactory services for you. If you wish to know more about this and more, please log on to http://www.tuningpianos.co.uk/blog/, or get in touch. And finally, remember that you can always expect outstanding services from us on every occasion.

How to Help the Piano Tuner When They Come to Your Home

When a piano tuner comes into your home to tune your piano, it is essential that you provide a conducive environment for him/her to do their work in peace. If you distract or fail to support them you will have failed yourself greatly, with your instrument and your pocket bearing the most damage. There are many things that you can do for them. They don’t necessarily have to be huge tasks. After all, it is the small things that matter. These things include;

 No noise

When piano tuners come to your home to work for you, it is vital that you provide a serene environment for them. This kind of atmosphere will enable them to concentrate on the task they are carrying out. If there is noise they will keep on getting distracted and this loss of concentration could have serious implications on the task at hand.

 Hospitality

When service people are within the confine of your home, they are like guests. It is therefore polite for you to cater to their needs. If they need a glass of water give them one and if it’s meal time give them food although it is not expected or required of you. It is all just a matter of common courtesy.

 Distractions

Ensure that there are no distractions during the period that the tuner is doing work on the piano. Dust it for him/her beforehand and make sure there are no objects placed on top of it. Also restrict your activities to other rooms in the house, and away from the piano’s proximity to accord the tuner time to work in peace.


It is important to support tuners when they come to your home to work on your piano. It helps to make their work easier to some extent.


Visit http://www.tuningpianos.co.uk/faq.html to find out more ways to help piano tuners in your home, and read more helpful advice. And if you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us.

The Importance of being Techy

It is remarkable to see how technology has transformed the lives of disabled people over the past few years. As a piano tuner technician relocating to London, I find the use of modern IT both challenging and exciting at the same time; more importantly the mixing of information propagation and communication coupled with my company’s service offerings as if to say that the old world has met the new. The contrast between using an ipad sending and receiving emails to arrange and confirm the servicing or tuning of a concert grand or an upright piano seems incredibly fascinating. The fact that I would use my conventional musical training and a tuning fork to calibrate the sound of a musical instrument back to concert levels, traveling to an area of London on the underground, when somebody has probably used their smart phone to contact me via my website, really brings together several centuries of human evolution as a single activity.

Owing to the use of technology, I am now able to actively engage with my social media, whether it be Facebook, Twitter or Linkedin, or writing my blog, or even uploading videos to my YouTube channel. With the use of assistive technology, it is now easier than ever to find my way around all the areas covered by AMH Pianos using a GPS that can verbally explain turn-by-turn directions to any address or post code – something that was not available to blind travelers right up to the turn of the century. Now, it only seems sensible and logical for disabled people to expect so much more from life with the use of technology to compensate for their physical or sensory limitation. Having an attractive website that explains my work, actively engaging with other disability organisations in the industry like The Association of Blind Piano Tuners, planning and researching new opportunities and business ideas, and even participating in professional organisations like the Institute of Musical Instrument Technology (IMIT), can all be put down to my fascination and sheer curiosity for the way things work online. Being able to fundraise for RP Fighting Blindness by running the London Marathon, receiving valuable feedback from the reviews and comments written by my valued customers, plus planning my social and recreational activities is now much easier than it was for my peers in the past few decades. I would go as far as saying that the presence of adaptive technology makes it possible for me to live an active and independent life, and establish and expand my work, whilst constantly increasingly my productivity even in the busy and relatively new location that is London. I can only hope for it to improve with the passage of time and sincerely hope that all possible measures are taken by the Government, businesses and technology companies to allow more disabled people to become self-reliant and greater contributors in our society.


assistive technology and piano tuning

Within the general public there is often a fear associated with new technology. This is mainly due to a lack of understanding of how new systems work and how to best take advantage of the new possibilities on offer. I truly believe that by constantly improving our understanding of what’s out there, not only can we eliminate our fear, but we can also become better human beings and contribute more to the best of our abilities to the things that we do best. On that note, if you would like the best, high quality maintenance, repair or safe transportation of your piano, please do not hesitate to contact me, either via the new world method of email on your smart phone, tablet or laptop, or the old fashioned dog and bone on 07500 661581. Whatever your preference you can always expect friendly and professional service for which there is no technological substitute anywhere in the world.