Is Fixing My Piano Part of the Tuning of the Piano?

People love freebies too much. Some have even come to love free things with an un-understandable keenness. People have almost learnt to wait for free things all the time, so much so that they begin to expect them automatically. Many people then have been quoted asking whether fixing their pianos is part of the process that includes tuning of the pianos.

The answer to that very common question is a No. The reason is that fixing of pianos is done whenever a piano has been damaged in any way. That is the scenario that calls for a specialist to repair it. If it is found to be beyond repair, it is then thrown into the lot where recycled materials are thrown.

Tuning though, is a gradual process that takes place regularly where an expert seeks to align the pitch and keys properly. Such an expert has the musical ear to know how to align and tune the keys, so that they produce the notes in the best way possible.

Inside a piano about to be tuned

Another huge difference between fixing pianos and tuning them is in the costs. Depending on the kind of damage that is being fixed, the cost could either be extremely high or extremely low. Tuning though, is a uniform process that may not vary very much in costing unless the demographics are too far apart. This is not a frequent occurrence. One cannot replace the other and it cannot complement the other.

Summary

Fixing pianos is quite demanding and takes quite a bit of time; therefore it cannot be considered to be part of the tuning process. The two are very different processes and they also require different specialisms too, to some extent.

Conclusion

Visit http://www.tuningpianos.co.uk/faq.html and have an audience with the experts who will tell you whatever else you would like to ask.

I am a piano tuner in Hammersmith & Fulham, a local London business working throughout London and based in the west of the city. Having moved to Hammersmith two years ago, it is wonderful, getting to know the city and supporting clients in all settings. please take a look at the Areas Covered Page and see if you can find your location.
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Andy

Blind Piano Tuner Takes on London

Meet the overly optimistic visually challenged man who has taken life head-on literally. Many people would consider moving into a large city to start a new job daunting and probably even cower from it but that was not so for an overly determined Andy Howard from Sulgrave Road, Hammersmith.

Andy moved a year ago from Bath his hometown and into the large city London to start a job as a piano tuner. As a child, he was diagnosed with clinical blindness and has lived with the condition all his life. Navigating London at times is frustrating for people with sight but Andy claims that he enjoys the remarkable transport system in London. He says that travelling by train is very easy for him and it is the means of transport that he uses to move around the city when he is going to work on people’s pianos.

He only sings unending praises for the transport system that he says is well coordinated and the staff who work for it. He says the trains are very well placed to accommodate the needs for visually impaired individuals. This is due to the audio messages announcing every stop or any other important announcement. He gladly tells of how the attendants on the train help him up the platform and into the train and help him alight when he gets to his destination.

Andy Howard tuning a piano

The 46 year old says that another thing that aids his movement from one place to another is his smartphone. He tells us of the audio setup that he uses to set up his GPS to guide him to and from the places he has to work. The device reads out messages, emails and calls to him and he can send them in the same way.

Andy is a man determined to make a living despite the challenges that plague his efforts on a daily basis. He is happy with what he does and hopes to get more in the future.

If you want to know more about this wonderful man or have a piano that needs some care, visit http://www.tuningpianos.co.uk. Hurry today.

The Cost of Piano Tuning

Just like when you go to the market to buy commodities, there is no merchant who sells their produce at the same price as another. They all have their quotations which depend on many variables. In the same way, the cost of piano tuning is not the same for all tuners. It depends on certain variables also. These variables include;

  • The skill of the tuner

If a piano tuner is highly skilled, he/she is in very high demand and therefore is likely to charge considerably more than the tuner who barely knows what they are doing and just charges anything and moves on.

  • Distance

If a piano tuner has to travel a long distance to tune your piano, your cost might be slightly higher because he/she has to recover the amount used to travel to and fro and also the time that was used on your project alone.

  • Experience of the tuner

Experience of the piano tuner is another variable that determines how much one has to spend to get their piano tuned. The more experience the tuner has, the higher the cost. The lower the experience of the piano tuner, the lower the cost of tuning it.

  • Age of the piano

The age of the piano is a huge factor in the determination of the cost to be charged for piano tuning. If the piano is a bit old, it requires more work and as a result the cost of tuning increases. If the piano is new however, it only requires a little touch-up and therefore the cost will be considerably lower.

 

Instrument studio

Summary

The cost of piano tuning very much varies based on diverse factors. It is important to ask the tuner before he/she starts on the work.

Conclusion

If you visit http://www.tuningpianos.co.uk/ you will find more information on the factors that determine the cost of piano tuning.

How often a piano should be tuned

Ownership of a piano is a major investment choice. Like all investments, it should be taken care of to ensure that it thrives and is worthy of the investment that was put into it. Taking care of a piano greatly involves tuning and maintenance. Every now and again it is important to tune your piano to ensure the immeasurable joy and melody that the instrument brings into your home and life is maintained. When it goes for a while without tuning, the grand instrument loses the tonal melody it produces and the melody quality that it produces is compromised.

Many people keep asking how often they should have their pianos tuned but that answer depends on a number of variables. This servicing time range is not the same for all kinds of piano. It is therefore very important to work in close contact with an expert to tell you when your piano is due for tuning. The longer you postpone your appointment with a tuner, the direr the situation your piano is in becomes. With time the bill increases exponentially. The quality of your instrument into which you invested so much reduces.

piano tuning hammer wrench tool

It is good to have your piano tuned at least every six months even if you do not use it much or at all. This allows it to remain in good condition when you come to use it again. If you use it regularly you should also have it tuned just as often. It is very important to take care of your assets and investments so that you get value for your money. The same is true in the maintenance of pianos.

Make sure to have your piano tuned frequently by a qualified service provider so that you can enjoy quality melodies for longer. If you wish to get in touch with such an expert, visit http://www.tuningpianos.co.uk/. Why wait, do it now.

Should You Tip a Piano Tuner?

The issue of whether or not it is good manners and proper etiquette to tip piano tuners, is very controversial. No one seems to agree on how the issue should be handled. There is no “one size fits all” here. Some feel that the tuner should be rewarded for his/her effort while others believe it is too much for them to expect gratuities; and there is another group that does not lean either way.

People usually have no reservations tipping other service providers, like valets, butlers, concierge staff or even hairdressers. Yet they seem to have a particular hangup when it comes to people within my industry. I wonder what difference there is between these individuals except their professions of course. Be that as it may, they are still service providers, and if it is right to tip some, then I think it is right to tip them all.

Due to the heated exchanges that ensue whenever this controversial topic is discussed, many have learned to resort to diplomacy when the subject is too much for them to handle. It is then you will hear them concur, saying that the choice should belong to the individual receiving the service, to decide whether to tip or not.

Gratuity Jar

For most service users, it appears that there is an unwritten rule: it’s ok to tip the tuner if they are self-employed but not if they are working for a large agency. It is not understood where these sentiments originated but since these make people feel better about not tipping piano tuners, there is nothing more that can be said. After all, the customer is always right. However, to reward good service, is an age-old incentive for even better receipt of provisions in the future.

Summary

If you have contracted the services of a piano tuner, it is up to you to decide whether the work they have done for you deserves a tip or not. If it does, tip them graciously, and you can expect your reward in return.

Conclusion

Remember to tip service providers if they have delivered satisfactory services for you. If you wish to know more about this and more, please log on to http://www.tuningpianos.co.uk/blog/, or get in touch. And finally, remember that you can always expect outstanding services from us on every occasion.

How to Help the Piano Tuner When They Come to Your Home

When a piano tuner comes into your home to tune your piano, it is essential that you provide a conducive environment for him/her to do their work in peace. If you distract or fail to support them you will have failed yourself greatly, with your instrument and your pocket bearing the most damage. There are many things that you can do for them. They don’t necessarily have to be huge tasks. After all, it is the small things that matter. These things include;

 No noise

When piano tuners come to your home to work for you, it is vital that you provide a serene environment for them. This kind of atmosphere will enable them to concentrate on the task they are carrying out. If there is noise they will keep on getting distracted and this loss of concentration could have serious implications on the task at hand.

 Hospitality

When service people are within the confine of your home, they are like guests. It is therefore polite for you to cater to their needs. If they need a glass of water give them one and if it’s meal time give them food although it is not expected or required of you. It is all just a matter of common courtesy.

 Distractions

Ensure that there are no distractions during the period that the tuner is doing work on the piano. Dust it for him/her beforehand and make sure there are no objects placed on top of it. Also restrict your activities to other rooms in the house, and away from the piano’s proximity to accord the tuner time to work in peace.

Summary

It is important to support tuners when they come to your home to work on your piano. It helps to make their work easier to some extent.

Conclusion

Visit http://www.tuningpianos.co.uk/faq.html to find out more ways to help piano tuners in your home, and read more helpful advice. And if you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us.

The Importance of being Techy

It is remarkable to see how technology has transformed the lives of disabled people over the past few years. As a piano tuner technician relocating to London, I find the use of modern IT both challenging and exciting at the same time; more importantly the mixing of information propagation and communication coupled with my company’s service offerings as if to say that the old world has met the new. The contrast between using an ipad sending and receiving emails to arrange and confirm the servicing or tuning of a concert grand or an upright piano seems incredibly fascinating. The fact that I would use my conventional musical training and a tuning fork to calibrate the sound of a musical instrument back to concert levels, traveling to an area of London on the underground, when somebody has probably used their smart phone to contact me via my website, really brings together several centuries of human evolution as a single activity.

Owing to the use of technology, I am now able to actively engage with my social media, whether it be Facebook, Twitter or Linkedin, or writing my blog, or even uploading videos to my YouTube channel. With the use of assistive technology, it is now easier than ever to find my way around all the areas covered by AMH Pianos using a GPS that can verbally explain turn-by-turn directions to any address or post code – something that was not available to blind travelers right up to the turn of the century. Now, it only seems sensible and logical for disabled people to expect so much more from life with the use of technology to compensate for their physical or sensory limitation. Having an attractive website that explains my work, actively engaging with other disability organisations in the industry like The Association of Blind Piano Tuners, planning and researching new opportunities and business ideas, and even participating in professional organisations like the Institute of Musical Instrument Technology (IMIT), can all be put down to my fascination and sheer curiosity for the way things work online. Being able to fundraise for RP Fighting Blindness by running the London Marathon, receiving valuable feedback from the reviews and comments written by my valued customers, plus planning my social and recreational activities is now much easier than it was for my peers in the past few decades. I would go as far as saying that the presence of adaptive technology makes it possible for me to live an active and independent life, and establish and expand my work, whilst constantly increasingly my productivity even in the busy and relatively new location that is London. I can only hope for it to improve with the passage of time and sincerely hope that all possible measures are taken by the Government, businesses and technology companies to allow more disabled people to become self-reliant and greater contributors in our society.

 

assistive technology and piano tuning

Within the general public there is often a fear associated with new technology. This is mainly due to a lack of understanding of how new systems work and how to best take advantage of the new possibilities on offer. I truly believe that by constantly improving our understanding of what’s out there, not only can we eliminate our fear, but we can also become better human beings and contribute more to the best of our abilities to the things that we do best. On that note, if you would like the best, high quality maintenance, repair or safe transportation of your piano, please do not hesitate to contact me, either via the new world method of email on your smart phone, tablet or laptop, or the old fashioned dog and bone on 07500 661581. Whatever your preference you can always expect friendly and professional service for which there is no technological substitute anywhere in the world.

 

Continental Variations

The cosmopolitan metropolis, our capital, has spawned many talented artists across all creative disciplines. As our population diversifies post world war II, we continue to embrace the fusion of styles, creating something entirely new representing the globalising, hybridising melting pot that is London. Extending our geographical reach across Europe, and further widening the net to the Middle East and North Africa, is it possible to separate London’s modern style, whose boundaries have been blurred into one another throughout history?

I notice an interesting modern musical phenomenon with a clear north-south divide. Music in southern Europe appears to have more of a pop variety, whilst the northerners lean towards heavier beats, culminating in the Scandinavian heavy metal craze. I can extend my argument by pointing to the boundaries of Europe where the style, to this day, retains its old world musical roots. One only needs to take southern Spain, where the music has Flamenco overtones (itself originating from the migrant Indian Gypsies), and Arabic and Hebrew styles due to the Muslim and Jewish communities respectively. Similarly Greek and Turkish music maintain their links to medieval classical music, as does the music of the Balkans and other southern European states. Note that Middle Eastern and North African music still sound similar to Klasma and Raga, that continue to be popular and prevalent long after their creation close to 1000 years earlier.

Now observe how Germanic, Celtic and similar northern European music has a more rock influence, with heavier, louder beats and a slightly classical melodic overlay. Additionally, notice how central European music appears to blur the boundaries between northern and southern styles, both in composition and performance. Interestingly, Scandinavian music continually produces heavy metal musicians in the modern charts, with acts like Lordi, even winning the Eurovision Song Contest.

Lordi winning Eurovision
Lordi winning Eurovision

Why this divide? Music is after all still performed using familiar instruments and mainly composed and taught in our curriculum using the piano, an instrument that has stood the test of time and heavily influences music across Europe and its surroundings regardless of genre. Certainly the northern regions experience extreme cold, whilst southern Europe and the Middle East can get temperatures in excess of 40c. Let’s also examine the more fast-paced, task-oriented life-style of the North, compared to the South’s relaxed, more leisurely approach. Surely these factors would affect the artists and adoring public alike. Factor in the industrial revolution, resulting in some of the most advanced infrastructure and social reforms on the planet in Northern Europe and Scandinavia. In contrast Southern Europe is presently experiencing a recession and a consequent drop in living standards. Returning to the arts, notice the linguistic precision English, German, Danish and Swedish and contrast this to the expressive richness of Italian, Greek, Turkish, and even Arabic and Hebrew. There is a musical connection, surely!

The Middle Ages had a more expressive way of doing things, longer attention spans and a depth of perception, since there were less things to do and even fewer advancements to compensate for human error. Hence the greatest classical musicians can be linked to this era. If these observations were to continue, would sound bytes replace symphonies? And does this mean that the next wave of musical geniuses will come from Southern Europe, the Middle East and North Africa? Finally, what conclusions can be drawn about the emerging culture of London as the population continues to rise and diversify and styles and roots constantly merge into each other?

Whatever your style and preference, talk to AMH Pianos about how we can help you get the most out of your piano. Also, the opinions and views of my readers are always highly appreciated. Have a great and  wonderful 2015.

Happy New Year 2015
Happy New Year from AMH Pianos

The Christmas-filled Winter Tones

It’s the run up to Christmas and the streets of London have a busy feel around them. Everywhere you see happy shoppers, excited kids and equally excited grown men dressed up as Santa Claus. Whilst each year a slew of new artists and albums are released, one can’t help but wonder why the same old Christmas pop music plays everywhere year after year, with countless remakes reaching the summit of the UK Top 40 Musical Charts. Certainly the style of music has evolved over the last few decades, with the classically themed 1930’s Christmas tunes giving way to Jazz in the 1950’s, Swing and Big Band in the 1960’s, which led to Rock & Roll, finally culminating in Electronic Techno by the mid to late 80’s. A simple question: what next?

Whilst one cannot criticise shifting tastes and human creativity, I feel somewhat aggrieved that the simple magical stylings, so rich in creativity appear largely absent from the Christmas soundscape as happy shoppers surround me with their shopping bags and festive mood. Whilst new and innovative styles of music, such as Rap, R & B, DubStep and Drum & Bass, make up our yearlong listening, why do they remain largely absent from our Christmas music? More pertinently, why have recording artists not been capitalising on this rather glaring omission?

Call me old-fashioned, or perhaps not quite down with the kids, but I was rather excited when in 2003, the Darkness released a brilliant Christmas tune that nearly made the Christmas Number One. I’m certainly not criticising any of the 80’s music either, since those artists did an amazing job back at the time that has stood the test of nearly two decades and still going strong. I am just trying to make a simple point about the perennial lack of new music and innovation around this joyous and festive time. Furthermore, it feels like there is a dilution and loss of the wonderful values and traditions that make Christmas a time for peace, love and togetherness. It’s the good values that create a great society and wonderful people. Whilst the underlying Christian traditions behind Christmas have been largely replaced with our society’s overemphasis on commercialisation, is there a direct correlation between the simple creativity of the seasoned professional musicians and its replacement with ‘X Factor’ like instant gratification of novices craving 15 minutes of fame? Perhaps I love a good simple melody which despite its simplicity, oozes style, warmth and creativity, and can be easily hammered out on a lovely grand piano.

Have you listened to a good Christmas tune lately? What are your favourite Christmas memories or melodies? Please share your views and opinions in the Comments. And from everyone at AMH Piano Tuning have a great Christmas and very best wishes for the Holiday.

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Merry Christmas from AMH Pianos